DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> PELICANPOST.BLOGSPOT.COM: In case you don't know why the UAE bailed on the DPW U.S. ports deal, here are two eye-opening articles detailing why Dubai wants to avoid scrutiny

Friday, March 10, 2006

In case you don't know why the UAE bailed on the DPW U.S. ports deal, here are two eye-opening articles detailing why Dubai wants to avoid scrutiny

Dubai, with its front companies, middlemen and little or no oversight and security is the go-to place for getting around export controls---where the modus operandi is to receive strategic, barred materials, then re-package them, then ship them by land, air or sea to a forbidden destination, such as Tehran, Iran.

Small wonder then that Dubai bailed when a huge American-public outcry spurred Congress-initiated investigations and legislation to block the UAE's DPW deal to purchase rights to manage 6 major U.S. airports.

As you will see, just the two columns featured below give us enough information to support our objections to the DPW takeover---and it looks as if there's far more to be discovered.

Read Mark Levin's take on the bail-out, in excerpts below and at nationalreview. And there is more at forbes, where you will find an earlier column by Matthew Swibel, published on 19 Apr. 04, that goes into much informative detail about Dubai's front companies and middlemen and how and with whom they do business. A lot of it is covert monkey business with specious trading partners such as Syria and Iran.
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"I Don't Blame The UAE For Bailing ..."

"If you want to get round export controls, just sell the product to a front company in Dubai. The middlemen will take it from there.

On paper the shipment was harmless enough. Sixty-six American-made spark gaps — high-speed electrical switches used in medical devices to break up kidney stones — traveled from the manufacturer in Salem, Massachusetts late last summer to a buyer in Secaucus, New Jersey. From there, according to the export declaration, they were to be shipped to their ultimate destination in Cape Town, South Africa. But these spark gaps can also be used to detonate nuclear bombs — and it turned out that the goods were aimed at an end user in Pakistan, with a stopover in Dubai.

The commercial capital of the United Arab Emirates, where trading activity accounts for the biggest single chunk (16.5%) of a $20 billion economy, has become a favorite diversion point on the Persian Gulf for shady cargo. With no export controls and hardly any bureaucracy at ports, airports and free zones, this entrepôt provides stellar cover for smugglers hoping to bypass U.S. embargoes...."

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